2015 International Human Rights Day Award

On December 10th, the Eugene Human Rights Commission awarded Occupy Medical for our commitment to the human right to health care!

The volunteers of Occupy Medical would like to give a huge thank you to our supporters who have helped us thrive throughout the years. Because of you, we have grown so quickly! Next step: brick and mortar?

It has been an incredible honor to serve our community and will continue to fight for universal health care for all.

In solidarity!

Sea Willow Herbs

Happy holidays one and all!

We at Occupy Medical received a surprise in the mail from a tiny herbal company on the East Cast. The owner was impressed with our work of bringing integrated healthcare to our community. She feels this is an honorable and far sighted project. She donated a good sized bag of muscle rub balms and a bunch of warming pine oil. She and I had a conversation about the pain that we treat at OM. It seemed clear that soothing topicals were important for the patients we serve.

Please join us in thanking the good people of Sea Willow Herbs for caring enough to send a box of their handcrafted natural medicine all the way from the East Coast to Eugene, Oregon. If you are interested in how they make their medicine, please click on the link below. This is their blog which includes basic instructions on making infused medicinal oil. Healthcare for All!
http://seawillowherbs.blogspot.com

The Gift

We get a lot of wonderful donations at Occupy Medical. We are moved to see how much love and support this community shares with those in need. When this particular donation came through the door, it struck us for its innovation, generosity and clear thoughtfulness. All of the items when new or newly made. They covered a wide spectrum of needs.
I knew that one of the donors had experienced homelessness as a youth. It occured to us that this meant that these were items selected through hard wrought compassion. The donors were all currently housed but hardly what could be called wealthy. It was a gift of the heart indeed. The donors gave us names that they felt comfortable posting on our site but were not looking for further recognition. We want to thank  Mr E Mann, Christie and Mary for their generosity and inspiration. Below is a list of the items they donated.
Blessings to all!

Hats (some were handmade, some store bought)
Sterno containers
Water bottles
Toothbrushes
Gloves
Combs
Razors
Deodorant
Dental floss packets
Soap
Flashlights
Perfume
Hair ties
Cologne
Batteries
Garbage bags
Tissues
Socks for both women and men

Rokz Donates to OM

Rokz, a local manufacturer in Eugene, surprised Occupy Medical today with a generous donation. Hospitality will be better stocked with food and hygiene supplies and the Treatment team got a few gifts as well. The company even tossed in doggie treats which are always a hit at clinic!

Click here to read the full list of donations they kindly provided.

Occupy Medical is grateful for the wonderful people at Rokz and everyone in the community who has supported us in our journey. It’s because of you that we are able to thrive.

Want to donate? There are many ways to help! If you plan to donate items, please take a look at our FAQ for instructions.

City Council Notes: Dec 8th

Hello,

My name is Sue Sierralupe. I have lived in Council member George Brown’s ward for over 20 years. I am also the clinic manager for Occupy Medical which has been serving the public as a free integrated health care unit for 3 years now.
We have been enjoying the break in the weather lately. It gives us a chance to catch up a bit. We did not have new frostbite patients this week. We can continue to treat the tissue damage from frostbite victims of November and the pain expressed as peripheral neuropathy from last winter’s victims. One must be grateful for the small favors the weather grants us.
There are some wonders of holiday season if you are a public servant. Citizens open their hearts to the plight of those that are less financially fortunate than themselves. We have had complete strangers and familiar faces like Ms. Dotson, show up with bags of donated socks, hand warmers and gloves. How nice to see that girl scout troop here looking for the same items that we need.
Our clinicians will note on their paperwork when a patient needs these warming items along with needed medication. The treatment team walks the patient to the hospitality tent to suit them up. Gotta follow doctor’s orders.
We were tickled to have a visit from a home-school group. Our board president, who is a loving father and a real kid person, delighted in giving them a tour before the clinic started. These children donated hand stitched portable sewing kits for the population we serve. They made them from felt and each had buttons, thread, pins, and sewing needles. Very handy for a population that wears tattered hand me downs. Each kit was a little different. Some had decorative ribbon. Some had fabric swatches used as covers. One of them had a rainbow drawn on the felt with a magic marker. What treasures!
I was happy to be in the room when you, city council, made the unanimous decision to approve these 2 new rest stops. Thank you so much! We see people make a big turn around in their lives when they are offered a place to safely sleep the night. It is an unpleasant fact that violence against the unhoused increases around this time of year too. We have not puzzled the reason for this trend out yet but I will let you know when we do. Having a place that allows our citizens to safely store their necessary items such as medicine, eat food that can be properly heated, change into dry clothes, sleep a full 8 hours and have protection from the elements. Bless you all for the work that you do to help our people. It makes a world of difference.

City Council Notes: Nov 24th

My name is Sue Sierralupe. I live in George Brown’s ward. I also have the honor to serve in this ward as the clinic manager of Occupy Medical. This is the week of Thanksgiving and I am here to count my blessings even though I should, by rights, be home baking pies for the oncoming horde of hungry relatives.
I am grateful for many things. I am happy that the Poverty and Homelessness Board has assembled to problem solve on the plight of economically desolate in our area. I was able to take off work long enough to attend one of the meetings. It was a brain storming session. We were lucky to be able to take some of these ideas to the University of Oregon the following week. My prayer is that they will act on these ideas and, at the very least, open a rest stop for unhoused students on their property. I would hope that students from all the local colleges would qualify to take refuge there.
I am grateful for the news that the county proposed a new rest stop at the Serbu/LCBH site. As a member of Occupy Medical, I have noticed that we will get visits from patients with serious conditions until they get housed at OVE or a rest stop. Then the visits slow or stop. The reason is that a sheltered person is able to set up necessary service and have the stability to heal.
I am grateful that Occupy Medical was honored with another award this year. Our clinic is an integrated health clinic meaning that we have complimentary holistic care along side “regular” medical care much in the same way that the Mayo Clinic is run. The American Herbalist Guild is the alternative care equivalent to the AMA. They gave us their annual community service award which delighted and encouraged my staff.
I am grateful that we had another celebrity visitor to our clinic this Sunday. Batman came by with his dad. Unlike what you may have learned in movies and comic books, Batman is actually 5 years old and sometimes substitutes a plastic sword for his utility belt.
This little superhero was very good at defending his father from evil and also took my advice about crime fighting more quietly in the clinical setting in stride. It is not easy to raise a child on the streets. There are some places to find shelter for families but those are challenging to find during this weather. Until their names come up, Batman and his dad have to hide. It is still illegal to camp in our fair city. I know that there are many reasons why the city is reticent to lift the camping ban for the winter. I could not find a good way to explain this to Batman. He is just too young to understand. I ask you to reconsider your position. We would all be grateful.

City Council Notes: Oct 28th

Hello,

My name is Sue Sierralupe. I have been living in George Brown’s ward for over 20 years. I am also the clinic manager for Occupy Medical. We had a wet and soggy day at OM yesterday. Despite the torrential rain, 45 patients made it to our clinic. The tent canvas is still drying out under a shelter. Some of our patients do not have this option. They just stay wet. And cold.
You may have seen an article yesterday in the Register Guard on an elderly unhoused woman named Susan who takes shelter from the elements in corners of the downtown landscape. The person featured has a special place in my heart. I met her a few years ago when Occupy Medical was just a little pop-up tent by the fountain.
An officer pulled me aside and pointed her out to me. He was worried about her fragile health. He had seen that her limp was worsening. He suggested that we meet.
Susan was leery of me when I first walked up to her cart. She pulled back and ducked her head. She had discovered that it was best to stay unseen on the streets. After a brief introduction and few minutes of speaking with each other, she warmed up to me and we soon became fast friends.
I count myself lucky to be on Team Susan. She has a ready wit and warm smile. We are both animal lovers and neither of us have outgrown our girlhood love of horses. This winter will be hard on her. She is worried that she won’t last the season.
There are wonderful things that you, as City council have done to make our patients lives better. Since the new bathrooms have popped up, UTIs have decreased within our patient load. Chemical burns from pesticides and herbicides that were obtained by laying on the grass in a public park used to a regular event. I haven’t seen a case like this for many months. Flu control is much easier now that public hand-washing is available at the Park Blocks. You are making a difference.
There is more work to do. We need secured sharps containers in our parks. We need another rest stop beyond Nightingale. We are in a state of emergency. People like Susan have nowhere to go. She tucks into a new corner every couple of nights. Tonight is her birthday. My gift to her is to advocate for her again tonight. Please lift the camping ban this winter. Please give Susan a chance to make it through another winter.

“Register Guard: The Depth of Winter”

Donations from Cascadia Learning Cooperative

These beautiful handmade sewing kits were donated by the talented children from Cascadia Learning Cooperative.

Each one is just a little bit different and reflect the artistry of the young students that fashioned them. They include buttons, thread, safety pins, needles and pins for patching the tattered hand-me-downs our patients often wear. You can imagine that the combination of beauty and practicality of these kits made them an instant hit.

City Council Notes: Oct 13th

Hello, my name is Sue Sierralupe. I am a proud member of George Brown’s ward. I am also the Clinic Manager of Occupy Medical, the free healthcare clinic that operates in the Park Blocks every Sunday from 12-4pm. I have mentioned in prior public comment periods here at city council, that our busy season is just starting up again.
This Sunday, we saw 53 patients. 28 were seen by our prescribers, 30 went through treatment, 14 were served in wound care. Support service aided 4 patients. We made referrals to our allies including Lion’s Club, White Bird and prescription support services. We fed and provided hygiene supplies for well over 100 visitors. It’s a busy 4 hours.
This Sunday was a bit more challenging to us not necessarily because of the increased numbers but because a segment of the population that we serve was agitated.
Come September, as the UO students return to campus, the police begin evicting the unhoused from their camps tucked away along the riverbanks. This makes them more visible than usual which is oddly ironic. It is no secret that our city is suffering from a serious lack of shelter for homeless citizens. Evicting them does not make them disappear. This is when we, at Occupy Medical, start seeing patients with signs of abuse. It is one of our seasonal upsurges.
This Sunday, as we were setting up our clinic, a member of our peacekeeping team came to get assistance to settle a problem at Kesey Square. An owner of a food cart there, had driven into the square, parked his car on the bricks and began yelling at the unhoused sitting by the Kesey statue. He threatened them and encouraged his dog to lunge at them. When my peacekeeper, who was on her way to her shift, interceded, he turned his abuse on her which included racist epitaphs. 
To our patients, this behavior, from this unstable citizen, was both outrageous and fairly commonplace. They frequently run into abusive people who are experts at finding victims that they perceive as voiceless. The news is filled with people like this attacking children, animals, the elderly and the disabled. The unhoused are attacked frequently. They don’t often report this abuse because they feel they have no voice and they endeavor it because they have no where else to go. Last Sunday, our people had Occupy Medical to serve as a safe haven. What happens the rest of the week?
What can you do? I will not presume to speak for our people but I am asking for their protection just as our city protects its other citizens. Please let our people have a place to rest this winter. Lift the camping ban. It’s the least you can do.

City Council Notes: Sep 22nd

Hello,

My name is Sue Sierralupe. I have been living in George Brown’s ward for over 20 years. I am also the clinic manager for Occupy Medical. Last time I was here, I gave a brief update on life in the clinic. We were having a brief lull in our patient load. This Sunday, our numbers increased by about 20%. We are seeing more children, particularly infants.
Last time I was here, I mentioned an enterovirus (EV D68) that was still a few states away and was causing serious problems for children and patients with asthma. Here I am 2 weeks later and this virus, for which we have no vaccine, has confirmed cases in CA, ID and WA. Believe me when I say that Oregon will be next. Since asthma rates for children in Eugene averages over 10% according to the 2013 study from OSU, citizens have every right to be concerned.
Our clinic serves a segment of the population that is often ignored. Health issues become more grave and harder to control the longer they are ignored. Many of our people lack the basics for good health. They don’t have good food, they don’t have heat, most of the time, they don’t even have dry socks. They are extremely vulnerable.
We are soliciting donations for respiratory infection control kits to be passed out at the clinic. These kits will include: masks, cough medicine, tissues, vitamins, herbal supplements, hand sanitizer, soap and information on disease control. We are reminding people to wash their hands properly, disinfect all surfaces and stay away from those that are ill. Although there are a few bumps to iron out on the Paid Sick Day ordinance here in Eugene, this is one of the changes that will make a difference for public health and I applaud you for endorsing it.
Our population is growing. We have more people collected in denser spaces, facing uncertain economic times and struggling to survive on less. One way you can help us is to open another rest stop for the unhoused so that people can maintain and recover from illnesses. Please remember that a roof is good medicine.
EV D68 is not the only disease that we will be battling this winter. It behooves us all as a community to build a climate in which all citizens can maintain good health: children and the elderly, women and men, housed and unhoused, rich and poor. If we work together wisely, we can make it through another winter and be better for it. Thank you for your continued support.