Support Lane Co Clinic Workers! AFSCME Continues Strike Through Weekend

Lane county nurses, mental health specialists, and other clinicians who serve some of our most vulnerable populations are demanding a fair, living wage. AFSCME, the union representing more than 600 county employees, and the county have not reached an agreement and the strike will continue over the weekend.

Oregon AFSCME spokesman Ross Grami: “We believe the gap between the parties to be roughly $1 million over three years for each contract. Their shameful actions are causing harm to vulnerable communities and to dedicated public servants. Our members will stay strong and united.”

Lane County Board of Comissioners:

    Call: 541-682-4203
    Fax: 541-682-4616

  • Jay Bozievich (District 1 – West Lane) jay.bozievich@co.lane.or.us
  • Pat Farr (District 4 – North Eugene) pat.farr@co.lane.or.us
  • Sid Leiken (District 2 – Springfield) sid.leiken@co.lane.or.us
  • Sorenson (District 3 – South Eugene) pete.sorenson@co.lane.or.us
  • Gary Williams (District 5 – East Lane) gary.williams@co.lane.or.us

County Administrator:

  • Steve Mokrohisky – Countyadministrator@co.lane.or.us

Occupy Medical in Need of New Home

Two weeks ago we received notice to cease operations at 509 as White Bird intends to sell the nearly 2,900sqft building on the corner of 13th and Ferry. At this time we do not have a new place to call home and our bus is in the shop for repairs which leaves us with nothing to operate. We are heartbroken by this outcome but have been through difficult times before and will return soon.

“Dear Occupy Medical,
I wanted to reach out to you all to talk about our current plans for the building at 509 E. 13th and update you on the collective’s current needs for that building. We have appreciated the current collaboration with you all, and we value the complimentary services that you have provided to the underserved folks in our community. Thank you for all the good work you have done and continue to do in our community.

Currently the agency is attempting to sell 509, which would give us seed money for a larger capital campaign that will result in our agency being able to increase capacity to serve more of the un/underserved people in our community. We have had 3 offers on the building in the last couple weeks and have decided that White Bird needs to ask Occupy Medical end operations at this building in two weeks from today’s date. (10/6/2017)

I really do love the work that you and your dedicated volunteers do for our area’s most vulnerable individuals and hope that our agencies’ long standing mutual aid relationship can continue into the future. I hope that our efforts to support the work you do has helped you in your mission and look forward to finding more ways that we can collaborate and support each other.
Thank you and please let me know if you have any questions, comments, or concerns,

Administrative Coordinator
White Bird Clinic”

“Occupy Medical Clinic Closed Sunday” – KEZI article here

City of Eugene ends Dog Ban Nov 1st

Register Guard – “In response to a request by The Register-Guard for data on the number of citations police issued under the dog ban, the police department’s spokeswoman said the department was still compiling that information. She said the information will be available next week.

Councilors Emily Semple and Betty Taylor had voted against the ban, saying its true intent was to drive out homeless people and others who loiter in the area. Many of them keep dogs for companionship and protection and have nowhere to leave the animals.”

Click here for the full article

We’ve Moved!

Just in time for the cold and rainy seasons, White Bird has kindly donated their old CAHOOTS building at 509 E. 13th ave, on the corner of Ferry St. Our stay is temporary at this time, but for the next three months we will have dry, warm spaces to provide free care. We have lights and plumbing! How exciting!

We are extremely grateful to White Bird for the ability to keep our patients out of the rain. We are also excited for our newfound free time from tent drying, which we intend to use for other projects in the community so keep your eyes peeled for more Occupy Medical actions!

Our humble little building is located across from the Bijou Art Cinema and next door to High Priestess Tattoo and Piercing and we’re open every Sunday! Intake sign-up is from 11:45am-3:00pm.

Occupy Medical goes to Coos Bay

Once a year, when the park blocks are occupied with another event, OM takes the opportunity to travel through Lane Co. in hopes to inspire others to start their own clinic and spread the notion that bottom line profits should never rule over patient care. On August 28th, we took our trusty Thunderbird bus outside of the area and set up camp at the Nancy Devereux Center in Coos Bay!

A huge thank you to our new allies in Coos Bay! It was a great day to spread healing to the coast.

Occupy Medical’s Annual Review 2015

Occupy Medical’s Annual Review 2015

Occupy Medical’s year included the recognition of our 501c3 status
. This has been a project that took much longer than originally expected for a variety of reasons. One of them was that the IRS changed its rules about the expected paperwork for organizations such as ours after our 1st draft was completed. Many hands went into the completion of this project and it is opening many doors for us financially. A big sigh of relief goes out now that we have attained this tax status.

Retreat/Training – April of 2015 held a big retreat and training opportunity for volunteers. We not only learned about HIPAA, deescalation techniques, harm reduction and OM’s history but we had a visioning segment that resulted in practical options for the future. We refined our mission statement and another job description as well as establishing official contact with the local SEIU reps. We look forward to holding another retreat/training next year.

November had another training and potluck for volunteers. This was held at a local neighborhood association building and offered a chance for attendees to share what brought them to OM before learning HIPAA basics from Dr. Bruce and OM history and structure from Sue.

We also joined Nonprofit Network at Donna R’s suggestion as they offer cost effective and valuable training which caters to organizations such as ours.

Other trainings in the community have been attended by OM volunteers in order to share this knowledge with the rest of the group. De-escalation techniques, for example, were taught to Ben and Ken of the Support Service team and they have done a fine job of sharing these principles with the team.

We forecast more trainings such as cultural sensitivity training and effective communication training along with updates of the traings mentioned above for 2016.

OM Teams – Currently, we have basic teams: intake, triage, prescribers, treatment, wound care, hospitality and now a combined team support/peacekeeping/translator team. Each team has at least one team lead. The combined team has 3 lead positions. These teams combined as their work interconnects fluidly during clinic. The requirements for each position are different but working together makes this team more efficient.

The treatment team took on another project: Rescue Packs under the guidance of treatment team member Dandy. The rescue packs consist of a bag of basic survival items such as toothbrushes, water bottles and nutritional supplies to be handed to unhoused “panhandlers”. The project was originally inspired by the death of an activist for the unhoused and veterans. It was clear that we needed to take an extra step during the week to keep our citizens set up with basic supplies. Originally put together to aid unhoused vets, this projects has broadened its reach.

Each team is working on their own protocols. Some have their approved version of protocols on our website for other agencies to use a template for patient driven care. More protocols are in process and we look forward to a finished copy in 2016.

Outreach – We have always strived to affirm healthy connections with other service organizations in our community. We believe that mutual support makes for a healthy community. Our work with St. Vincent de Paul, Hearts for Hospice, CALC, the Rotary Club, Egan Warming Center, Food not Bombs, and Burrito Brigade has resulted in more help for those we serve. This year we met with HIV Alliance to strengthen our bond. They have in turn, invited us to trainings and enjoyed sharing donations.

A new ally this year is Catholic Community Workers led by Brother Charlie. He and his crew serve breakfast to the hungry at the Park Blocks as we are setting up clinic which has resulted in toning down some behavioral issues stemming from malnutrition for the unhoused. We strive to make more allies in 2016.

Our members sent representatives to serve at a free clinic in cooperation with Centro Latino Americano this fall. This was a success and we look forward to extending this project with more volunteers from more teams in 2016.

Outreach is often achieved via speaking engagements, rallies, conferences and the media. To this end, both Sue and Ben have spoken at events and to the media on OM’s principles and concerns. Many members of OM have written op-eds and letters to the editor on topics relating to public health topics. Every month, we have at least one member of OM speak during the public comment section of city council (such as Crys, Lonnie, Terra, Donna R and Sue). We have attended and tabled at many conferences and rallies. Social media has been kind to us. Our website and Facebook group are active with new members seeking inclusion every week. We started a Facebook page at the advice of Connor and this is growing steadily. A feed from this page is included on our website. Twitter may be the next social media step for OM.

Bus Development – The bus has been getting regular maintenance work over the years and a few minor improvements but 2015 brought us a gift in the guise of Carrier RV Service. They offered to do the remodeling of the bus at cost for supplies and not charge us for the labor. The first improvement was installing much needed heat. The source is a propane heater system that solves several problems at once. This was the brain child of Scott, our hospitality volunteer. It was tried out this November and worked like a dream.

The future remodeling will include better shelving and room dividers.

Grants/Awards – This year started with a grant from Church of the Resurrection. We are looking to write more grants for paid staff and, ultimately, a brick and mortar.

December 10th, 2015 Occupy Medical is receiving the Humanitarian of the Year award by the city of Eugene’s Human Rights Commission.

Note: This review is by no means complete but serves as bare bones assessment of the year from the clinic manager’s perspective.

We’ve got mail, Thank you S.

This wonderfully kind and thoughtful letter of support has finally made it’s way to us after winding around the country! We are so glad to hear from S., thank you so much for your support.

Letter from S.

Letter from S.

“Hi great people:
I was deeply moved by the article written by Clinic mgr. in current Eugene Weekly! I chose to be homeless from 20-23 during my California and Hawaii hippie years and I remember much freedom and fun – but also much cold, hunger, being soaked & danger! Keep up your excellent & kind work!
-S”

Annual Membership Meeting & Board Elections

Hello all Occupy Medical members!

We are having our annual membership meeting this Wednesday, February 24 at 6:00pm!
This is when we hear from leadership concerning the state of Occupy Medical and the vision for 2016.
We are also going to review Occupy Medical’s Bi-Laws and this is our opportunity to amend them.

In addition, this meeting will hold our elections for seats on our board of directors.
If you’d like to run for an available board seat, please announce on candygram and/or tell an existing board member.

Your participation is needed and appreciated!

It will held at “The Campus Glenwood” at 13th & Alder.

Hounds and Homeless

Our wonderful allies at Hounds and Homeless stopped by clinic with a bunch of goodies for the furry companions of those on the streets. It was quite the pleasant surprise and the pets at the park blocks were especially excited for delicious treats and lots of love!

“Helping to improve the health and safety for Homeless pets and their people, in the Eugene and Springfield area,” the mobile volunteer organization recognizes barriers the homeless/houseless community faces when accessing care for their cats and dogs and the group assists where they can by provides food, flea medicines, general supplies, and the occasional vaccination, spay/neuter, and emergent vet service.

Follow this link to learn more about them and how you can help!

Thank you, Hounds and Homeless, for your dedication! Health care truly is a right for all.